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Monthly Archives: June 2013

It’s love that builds community

ivonprefontaine:

It does take love to build a community. It takes someone giving directives to build a team. They are so different and yet often confused.
I am on my way to Spokane over the next 24 hours so I am not sure about tending my blog for the next few days as I travel and settle into a different routine.

Originally posted on A life itself:

love builds communityWhen we participate in a spiritual or healing practice, we become one with the source of abiding and ever-present love.

We share, co-create and sustain a safe place where compassion and wholeness can be nurtured for ourselves and others.

Participating in a spiritual practice is like lovingly tending to your plot in a community garden. Initially, the immediate benefit is personal. As the flowers and plants in your plot are nourished and receive regular care, the scraggly shoots thicken and unfurl abundant new leaves and buds.

Eventually, the other community gardeners take notice of your beautiful flowers or vegetables, and are inspired to spend more time weeding, watering and caring for their own plot. One or two may even kindly pull a few weeds in a neighboring plot to offer support for someone who was not able to make it over to the garden that week.

As more of the…

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Harvest Home

Tomorrow is my last day. I looked for the poem I thought would speak most eloquently to the role teachers can play. Bettye T. Spinner wrote this lovely poem. What if our classrooms were poetry meant to be lived and learned? It would speak to the wonder and awe of each day we spend with children.

In the ideal

it is harvesting

the work we do–

a reaping of crops grown

from ancestral seeds,

a gathering of first fruit,

from vines that traces their sources

beyond geography,

beyond gender,

beyond the bleach

and blush

and black of skin

and root themselves in watery grace,

in knowledge that nurtures us all.

In the ideal

our classrooms fill, like cornucopia,

overflowing with the bounty of our grange.

Life stories, heaped among the texts,

spill into hallways of our schools,

crowd the sidewalks or the subways

or ride yellow buses home,

altering the form of knowing,

changing heads,

changing hearts,

changing history,

bringing harvest

home.

Thinking

ivonprefontaine:

What a beautiful sentiment this is. Take care and have a wonderful day.

Originally posted on Busy Mind Thinking:

Thinking

This is the place
where I do my
best thinking.

Hugs everyone.

Photo credit: Google images

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I Am a Teacher

A student gave me this poem Thursday. The Alberta Teachers Association published it in their monthly newspaper recently. Susan Holland, a retiring teacher, wrote it. Is there such a thing as a retiring teacher?

The poem encapsulates many of my current feelings and points to the impact we have on children and families. The gesture of giving me the poem is deeply meaningful and I am grateful to receive and share it.

I Am a Teacher

You are my children.

We triumph together when you master cursive.

We struggle through long division.

I wipe away your tears when something bruises you elbow

Or someone bruises your heart.

You read to me—I read to you.

We laugh over silly jokes or stories.

I introduce you to new words—

You refresh me with new perspectives.

I wasn’t there when you were born.

I don’t tuck you in at night …

Or dance at your wedding.

But, you are my children.

And as June draws to a close

I grow melancholy.

You will move on and I will stay behind to start again.

And as the years pass you blend, merge, and mingle—

Warp and weft intertwined into my universal child.

I am a teacher.

You are the fabric of my life.

 

MATTHEW – POSTSCRIPT

ivonprefontaine:

I posted this poem some time ago, but Simon explains why we keep coming back to Mary Oliver and her beautiful poetry over and over. For that matter, it is why we come back to poetry or the writings of people like Parker Palmer, Thomas Merton, and Thich Nhat Hanh who incorporate poetry in their prose.

Originally posted on Simon Marsh:

MARY OLIVER just “gets it” doesn’t she? That’s why we keep coming back to her, again and again, when we long to make real prayer, when we long to make love. For Wisdom dwells in her – in the longing, that’s to say. And in the poet.

And today, for reasons that are obvious enough – my “soft animal body” having been intensely connected with Matthew’s this morning – Mary’s “Wild Geese” plays in my head and heart, over and over and over. Mary Oliver just gets it. Life, I mean. And love. Mary Oliver just gets it. And gives it – like all the poets do – to us …

You do not have to be good.
You do not have to walk on your knees
for a hundred miles through the desert repenting.
You only have to let the soft animal of your body
love…

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renewal

ivonprefontaine:

Each day should bring up a sense of renewal. It would be like picking up the edge of the ocean, shaking it out a bit, and letting it find its place again. This is a beautiful poem that gently reminded me of the need for self-renewal each moment, each day. Take care.

Originally posted on who could know then :

 photo tumblr_lqp396S3741qg39ewo1_500.gif

and if i

sound wde eyed,

it’s because

i am.

i’m

a little

in awe of what

i’ve become,

so late

in my

day.

this poem was submitted to
20 Lines A Day prose and poetry
challenge for the month of April.

http://anexerciseindiscipline.com/2013/04/10/renewal/

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The Smartest Thing

ivonprefontaine:

Maya Angelou is a wonderful poet and writer. Her quotes are gentle reminders of what should be important in life. This one asks me to stop and be present in this moment. It is the most important moment I have, because it is the only moment I can live in fully.

Originally posted on Positive Outlooks Blog:

If you must look back, do so forgivingly. If you will look forward, do so prayerfully. But the wisest course would be to be present in the present gratefully.  Maya Angelou

gratefully

[John De Bord Photography]

77487-50-most-banned-books-i-know-why-the-caged-bird-sings-maya-angelou-1969

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