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A Time to Talk

Robert Frost’s poem foreshadowed a need to make real human contact. There are times we need to move beyond the virtual realities, set the hoe down, and engage in those friendly visits. Human contact in the form of sound, touch, smell, and visuals is a human need that cannot be overlooked. It is a sensual place and space to be. It touches our spirit and makes us whole.

When a friend calls to me from the road
And slows his horse to a meaning walk,
I don’t stand still and look around
On all the hills I haven’t hoed,
And shout from where I am, What is it?
No, not as there is a time to talk.
I thrust my hoe in the mellow ground,
Blade-end up and five feet tall,
And plod: I go up to the stone wall
For a friendly visit.

About ivonprefontaine

I have been an educator for almost 20 years. Prior to that, I worked in private industry for 15 years, then returned to university to earn my education degree. For the past 11 years, I have been a co-creator of learning in a unique, progressive, alternative educational school of choice. Currently, I am engaged in a doctoral program at Gonzaga University in Spokane. A main theme in my learning there has been the roles of systems thinking, complexity theory, and organizational theory, and how they apply to education generally and the learning environment I share with students, parents, and colleagues.

19 responses »

  1. Talking, instead of texting and not making eye contact, is a lost art.

    Reply
  2. Now you are talking about the ‘good old days, the way it used to be. I remember visiting a cousin in a fairly small town in Texas and learning that she had no idea who her neighbors were. I was ‘dumb-founded’ as we use to say, because I lived in the country and we knew our neighbors for several miles in every direction. We’ve lost a lot to the name of progress.

    Reply
    • I just replied to a comment and shared how my Grandmother, who only spoke French, and a neighbour, who only spoke Russian, stood at the end of our garden and chatted, laughed, and understood each other. Community is something that we communicate about things we hold in common.

      Reply
  3. Touching and nonverbal communication are the bulk of communication skills. While I love my computer, it doesn’t afford us that. We are body-less entities in each other’s heads. Yet, your words reverberate, and your kindness touches me through the spirit living in your words. How does that happen?

    Reply
  4. Reblogged this on A Common Place and commented:
    Ivon writes of a common need and therefore a common place

    Reply
  5. Human touch; souls communicating, even in silence as they look into another’s eyes; powerful. This, too is a practice. Oh…the limitations of technology….
    Lovely poem. Important reminder to us all.

    Reply
  6. A reminder of days when someone dropping by was a pleasant surprise, not an interruption.

    Reply
    • I remember the days when my Grandmother, who only spoke French, stood at the back of our property and talked to another lady, who only spoke Russian. They enjoyed the company and seemed to understand each other. My grandmother would come back to the house and bring us up-to-date on happenings of our neighbours.

      Reply
  7. Very meaningful for all of us, to take time away from our work to continue a friendship. Chatting can be such a special way of connecting and helps both in the dialogue, too! Robin

    Reply
    • I mentioned on a couple of other comments that my grandmother, who only spoke French, used to have regular conversations with another lady who lived across the road from us. She only spoke Russian. They would talk, laugh, and my grandmother would come in and bring us up-to-date on the life of this lady and her family.

      Reply
  8. Thank you for sharing! I have read several of your posts and found them inspiring and wise.

    Reply

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