RSS Feed

Daily Reflection and Peace

Daily Reflection and Peace.

We face an important challenge with mindful practice. The article linked above addresses this challenge with questions. Questions are fundamental to being challenged. When I am challenged, I ask questions. I question what is happening and what is making me feel a particular way.

When I read many articles about mindfulness, I find the articles miss the key underlying aspect of mindfulness, being present in the world in ways that improve one’s life and in that improvement the world is continuously becoming a better place. It is not about a corporate bottom line in the way we understand a corporate bottom line. I guess the bottom line is harder to measure. I cann0t apply a number to it, report it to shareholders, and make a banker satisfied. What I can do is ask, “Did I make the world a better place in some way by becoming a better person?”

Can you imagine if 7 billion plus people worked on making the world a better place through their living? That might be a number that is unmeasurable, but that is OK. It would be so big it would not need to be reported. Its quality would speak for itself.

About ivonprefontaine

I have been an educator for almost 20 years. Prior to that, I worked in private industry for 15 years, then returned to university to earn my education degree. For the past 11 years, I have been a co-creator of learning in a unique, progressive, alternative educational school of choice. Currently, I am engaged in a doctoral program at Gonzaga University in Spokane. A main theme in my learning there has been the roles of systems thinking, complexity theory, and organizational theory, and how they apply to education generally and the learning environment I share with students, parents, and colleagues.

20 responses »

  1. Tseng Tzu’s quote is summed up in one word, to me, “integrity.” Sometimes I am startled by how many in the world actually attempt to sabotage this. Still, it’s a worthwhile practice. For sure.

    Reply
    • It always is worth while. David Jardine, a professor at the University of Calgary, splits the word worthwhile to describe whiling over things, events, and beings of worth. In this way we are joined with them, creating a unity and integrity. It is slow, patient work that many choose to avoid perhaps.

      Reply
  2. Right mindfulness, brings necessary attention to what is going on inside and outside.
    It is right view, right intention, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, and right concentration that complete the wisdom prescription. Interesting to think that non-judgmental, present moment awareness has inherent or implied virtues, imho :-)

    Reply
  3. Amen! I pray that one day the whole human race would live to make it a better world. Blessings, Natalie :)

    Reply
  4. How can we do it? We have been having the discussion on my blog. Men who have been to war don’t know how to stop the fanatics that are slaughtering people in the Middle East and throughout the world. How can anyone talk to those religious fanatics that kill people (babies) because they don’t believe in their god? No one has answers. If Peace is logical, sane and healthy, WAR is the exact opposite. What can we do? Not one person has any idea/s on how we can stop the slaughter. How can we spread mindfulness to people who are insane? We need answers. Workable answers. If you have any ideas, please tell let us know.

    Reply
  5. hitandrun1964, I admire your passion and your questioning. I see so much of myself in it, but, and maybe this is a cop out, I have come to a place where I no longer ask “how” I simply try and “be” in the world that I touch and which touches me daily. I try and express my rather poor attempt at being mindful in that world, and when it comes to the end of the day, I do two things, first, I try and see and feel gratitude for what I’ve received from others and the events of the day, and second, I look to see how I have contributed to life around me and that’s it. Sounds rather simplistic, but it’s what keeps me sane. Strength to you friend. :)

    Reply
    • Simple is good in living and being in the moment. Complicated tries to jump out of the moment we live in and bypass it. When we keep it simple, we find the right questions.

      Take care and be well.

      Reply
  6. To live to make the world a better place, one needs to make it better for everyone not just for the one trying to make it better. Such a fine line. If one opts to make it better for everyone it ultimately become better for the one. So often this is forgotten. It is not what is good for me is good for you – it is what is good for you is good for me. Great post.

    A big question: How does one person take this task and reach out to the millions around them to change this world? A big task and one worth doing if we could just get it started.

    Reply
    • Sometimes it is about the small things i.e. a smile, an act of kindness, a word of encouragement, etc. Hopefully, when that happens, our kindness and thoughtfulness is paid forward.

      Your question is an important one and one we should carry with us exploring it daily.

      Reply
  7. I think there are millions of people working on making a better world, but it can take a few evils and some bad apple to change that…

    Reply
    • The millions have to keep working. Our little bit every makes a difference. We were in a restaurant today and they were busy plus short-staffed. It was easy to grumble and some people did. One group about 15 minutes ahead of us to catch a ferry. The waitress had been abrupt with them and they were openly critical of the “poor service.” We left and caught the same ferry the other group did. Before we did, we thanked the young lady and she smiled. We can only do our small parts and hope it helps someone get through their day making it a good one for others.

      Reply
  8. I could not agree with you more, Dear Ivon! It’s so easy to get overwhelmed, thinking that our little efforts won’t make much of a dent in the problems of the world. Yet, as you said, if we focus on bringing respect and kindness into every interaction — from the postal clerk to the flight attendant ( 😜 ) — the difference is cumulative. Not only does it feel good to possess integrity, but now the person you’ve touched with such positivity is more likely to move forward with a newfound spring in their step and zip in their attitude. And so on. and so on…

    Thank you for sharing your wonderful insight!!

    Reply
  9. One of the toughest things for me is living mindfully.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 4,728 other followers

%d bloggers like this: