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Even in Temples

Deng Ming-Dao writes how silence has sound. When I meditate, the sounds I hear strike me. Leonard Cohen’s quote echos that with “There is a crack in everything. That’s how the light gets in.”

Our senses cannot be totally shut off. We feel, hear, see, smell, taste, etc. even when we do not realize it. It is in the moments of quiet or darkness that we see sounds and light are always there. When we are mindful and attentive to our activities and senses, what we did not sense is there. It is in the mindful and meditative moments that the world–its allness–are there for us to soak in.

I told my students that much of the meaning to be found in poetry came in the pauses and silences between words, lines, and stanzas. Poetry touches our souls in those silences. When we pause and soak in the poetry, including the silences it shares with us, the meaning comes to life, only to change the next time we read the lines. In this sense, poetry, like life, is about living its meaning, sensing that is fleeting, incomplete, and fluid.

Even in temples
Where residents vow never to talk,
And silence is worshiped,
There is sound.
There are songs.
There is poetry.

Memories incarnated,
Lifetimes pulled through a thousand minds,
Cadences bearing time,
Rhymes connecting life,
Stanzas stacked like the generations.

Those who follow Tao write poetry.
Read poetry.
Live poetry.
And enter Tao through its lines.

About ivonprefontaine

I am a retired educator who recently completed a PhD at Gonzaga University in Spokane, WA. My dissertation topic and research was how teachers experience becoming who they are as teachers, as human subjects. For me, teaching is a calling and vocation that allows me to express who I am as a person. Currently, I am waiting and listening to what will call me. We have begun a small consulting and leadership firm called Rocky River Leadership & Consulting Ltd.

17 responses »

  1. A beautiful light filled post Ivon. Thank you. ☀️

    Reply
  2. this offers me a
    moment of lightness 🙂

    Reply
  3. Soaking still. Had to read the text repeatedly to get a true feel of it! Excellent!

    Reply
  4. The breath, our most immediate necessity, has two pauses, after the inhale and exhale. If we quiet enough, the inhale and exhale make sounds.

    Our bodies are in motion with the inhale and exhale, it is only when we pause that our bodies are in a sort of suspended animation.

    We miss the small miracles that surround us, our minds race and multitask getting lost in thought and emotion.

    We rarely leave our head to xperince life from our heart, where a deeper knowing exists.

    Reply
  5. Yes. I am one who hears sounds in silence, often music. It makes ‘listening to music ‘ almost vulgar in comparison. Love the Cohen quote and the post in general. Aloha, Ivon.

    Reply
  6. What a beautiful and inspiring post! I am made better for reading it, and echo the sendiment of meditating and reflecting on life, in the stillness and silence of life. Thank you for sharing! 🙂

    Reply
  7. Just like poetry, I’ve heard it said that music is the silence between the notes. In meditation, the silence brings sights and sounds not normally seen or heard…at least it does for me.

    Reply

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