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Daily Archives: December 21, 2014

Be Still in Haste

Wendell Berry is one of my favourite poets. He writes with such clarity and practical appreciation for the world. Even in clarity, the world remains ambiguous and fuzzy.

I read the last stanza of this poem as an example of the paradox and tension we try to hold. Perhaps, as much as I would like it to be different, time is always starting over in each moment. Each moments holds the eternity of time to paraphrase Alfred North Whitehead, yet I do not sense that unless I pause and notice time is passing me by.

Unless I pause, time passes me by and, yet, I cannot hold time still. It is inevitable it will start afresh in the next moment. In these pauses, I encounter the world and living as creative processes which I experience more fully when I am awake.

How quietly I
begin again

from this moment
looking at the
clock, I start over

so much time has
passed,  and is equaled
by whatever
split-second is present

from this
moment this moment
is the first.

 

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Schlumbergera truncata (Christmas Cactus)

Schlumbergera truncata (Christmas Cactus)

When we went to the farm for Christmas the Christmas Cactus in the front porch area would be blooming some years to greet us. They are absolutely breathtaking in full bloom.

The Tropical Flowering Zone

Happy Holidays to all! I will be back shortly with the Pinwheel Flower’s corrugated cultivar form, but I was interested in posting about the Christmas Flower Cactus plant because I was able to acquire a flowering specimen, and was amazed to see the flower in full bloom for the first time. Contrary to my beliefs, these cacti are exclusive to Brazil’s coastal mountain forests. Schlumbergera truncata (Christmas Cactus)

 Schlumbergera truncata (Christmas Cactus) Aka Christmas Cactus, Thanksgiving Cactus, Crab Cactus, or Zygocactus, is native to Brazil, Rio de Janeiro (Serra do Mar and Serra dos Orgãos), to the coastal forests and jungles at an altitude of 100-1500 m. In its native environment it is an epiphyte (occasionally lithophytic, growing on both trees and rocks). They grow their roots into the bark of their host tree. Their only access to moisture and nutrients is from rain and droppings that fall from above. They also always grow under a…

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